Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project Highlights Culture – NIJ Publications Update

Office of Justice Programs sent this bulletin at 07/27/2015 12:00 PM EDT

Title: Love One Another and Take Care of Each Other: A Process Evaluation of the Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project (pdf, 51 pages)
Author: Lama Hassoun Ayoub
Abstract:

Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project (RBCEVP) is informed by a commitment to culture as prevention. The program centers on the belief that reconnecting youth and families with the Chippewa Cree language, culture and traditions will influence children’s exposure to violence on the reservation.

One of the primary components of the RBCEVP is advocacy and case management. The RBCEVP staff several domestic violence/sexual advocates and child advocates. The advocates provide crisis intervention services, court and medical advocacy, development of safety plans, referrals to treatment and other providers, and traditional healing ceremonies.

Another major component of the project is community awareness and education. The RBCEVP utilized a variety of approaches to community awareness to spread the message about children’s exposure to violence and the resources that are available to children and families. Other components of the project include professional training for local partners as well as prevention work with youth in schools, including leading and supporting student groups in the local schools and holding summer youth camps for at-risk youth.

Despite some staff turnover and challenges, Rocky Boy’s Children Exposed to Violence Project produced important accomplishments: 1) bringing a strong advocacy program to the reservation and providing victims with assistance; 2) providing prevention programming and support services to Rocky Boy’s youth; 3) providing greater access to training for local service providers; and 4) raising community awareness about children’s exposure to violence through concerted awareness campaigns.

Throughout this work, the RBCEVP staff have infused a culture-based approach and have reinstilled a focus on Chippewa Cree language, spirituality, and tradition, reflecting the strengths of traditional culture as a protective factor. By helping youth and community members improve their connection to their culture and the Chippewa Cree way of life, they could be impacting children’s exposure to violence in ways that are difficult to measure.

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National American Indian Court Judges Association 2015 Award Solicitation

The National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA) Board of Directors is soliciting nominations for four (4) NAICJA awards: the Lifetime Achievement Award, the Judicial Excellence Award, the Court Support Excellence Award and the Outstanding Service Award.

Please use the 2015 NAICJA Award Nomination form. If a nomination was submitted in prior years and the nominator wishes for that prior nomination to be considered (and the person nominated continues to meet the award criteria), please contact NAICJA 1st Vice-President Kevin Briscoe at kbriscoe@choctaw.org or at (601) 650-1658.

Nominations close: August 10, 2015.

The awards will be announced and presented during the 46th National Tribal Judicial and Court Personnel Conference on October 6-9, 2015 at the Seneca Nation Resort & Casino in beautiful Niagara Falls, New York.

Established in 1969, NAICJA is non-profit 501(c)(3) membership organization of present and former tribal court judges, court personnel and other tribal justice system supporters from approximately 300 tribal courts throughout the United States. NAICJA provides support, continuing education and technical assistance to tribal justice systems and seeks to further public knowledge and understanding of tribal courts.

For more information:

Click Here to view the  2015 Awards Solicitation.

Click Here to download the 2015 Nomination Form.

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Tribal Wildlife Grants Program

Tribal Wildlife Grants Program – The Tribal Wildlife Grants (TWG) Program fall under the wildlife conservation grants (known as the State Wildlife Grants Program) to States and to the District of Columbia, U.S. Territories, and Tribes under provisions of the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, for the development and implementation of programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, species of Tribal cultural or traditional importance, including species that are not hunted or fished. TWG originates from the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2002 (Pub. L. 107-63), when Congress first specified that the Service use a portion of the funds under the State Wildlife Grants Program to establish a competitive grant program available to federally recognized Tribes. This language allowed the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, through the Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), to establish a separate competitive Tribal grant program, known as TWG, which would not be subject to the provisions of the formula-based State Wildlife Grants Program, or other requirements of the State Wildlife Grants Program portion. Current Closing Date for Applications: October 30, 2015.

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NCAI Action Alert: Indian Affairs to Mark-up S. 1704, the SURVIVE Act, on July 23

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will be considering S. 1704, the Securing Urgent Resources Vital to Indian Victim Empowerment Act, or “SURVIVE Act,” on Wednesday, July 22, at 2:15pm. The bill would create a new grant program for services for crime victims at the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Office of Tribal Justice Support. Funding for the program would come from a 5% allocation from the Crime Victims Fund (CVF). Total distributions from the CVF are expected to be around $2.6 billion this year, and 5% for the new tribal program would be $130 million. NCAI sent a letter to the Committee supporting S. 1704 and making several suggestions for strengthening the legislation. NCAI’s recommendations include:

  • Clarifying that the new program should be a formula rather than a competitive program.
  • Permanently authorizing the program in the same manner as other CVF-funded programs, rather than having the program expire after a 10-year period.
  • Clarifying that tribes in PL 280 states are eligible for the program on the same footing as other tribes.
  • Clarifying the data collection requirements to safeguard victim confidentiality and safety.
  • Removing the provision requiring negotiated rulemaking and instead requiring government-to-government consultation.

The full bill text is available here.  NCAI urges tribes and other interested stakeholders to communicate their support and any recommendations for amending the legislation to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

NCAI Contact Information: Virginia Davis, Senior Policy Advisor, vdavis@ncai.org.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative

Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative – The primary purpose of this grant program is to accomplish the Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative (DVPI) goals listed below: 1. Build Tribal, Urban Indian Health Program (UIHP), and Federal capacity to provide coordinated community responses to American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) victims of domestic and sexual violence. 2. Increase access to domestic and sexual violence prevention, advocacy, crisis intervention, and behavioral health services for AI/AN victims and their families. 3. Promote trauma-informed services for AI/AN victims of domestic and sexual violence and their families. 4. Offer healthcare provider and community education on domestic and sexual violence. 5. Respond to the healthcare needs of AI/AN victims of domestic and sexual violence. 6. Incorporate culturally appropriate practices and/or faith-based services for AI/AN victims of domestic and sexual violence. To be eligible for this “Limited Competition” in an effort to address behavioral health disparities within AI/AN communities, the Indian Health Service (IHS) is limiting eligibility to Federally recognized Tribes, Tribal organizations, and Urban Indian organizations. Eligible applicants are as follows: — Federally recognized Indian Tribe, as defined by 25 U.S.C. 1603(14); — Tribal organization, as defined by25 U.S.C. 1603(26); — Urban Indian organization as defined by 25 U.S.C. 1603(29). Current Closing Date for Applications: September 08, 2015.

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Methamphetamine and Suicide Prevention Initiative

Methamphetamine and Suicide Prevention Initiative – The primary purpose of this grant program is to accomplish the Methamphetamine and Suicide Prevention Initiative (MSPI) goals listed below: 1. Increase Tribal, Urban Indian Health Program (UIHP), and Federal capacity to operate successful methamphetamine prevention, treatment, and aftercare and suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention services through implementing community and organizational needs assessment and strategic plans. 2. Develop and foster data sharing systems among Tribal, UIHP, and Federal behavioral health service providers to demonstrate efficacy and impact. 3. Identify and address suicide ideations, attempts, and contagions among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations through the development and implementation of culturally appropriate and community relevant prevention, intervention, and postvention strategies. 4. Identify and address methamphetamine use among AI/AN populations through the development and implementation of culturally appropriate and community relevant prevention, treatment, and aftercare strategies. 5. Increase provider and community education on suicide and methamphetamine use by offering appropriate trainings. 6. Promote positive AI/AN youth development and family engagement through the implementation of early intervention strategies to reduce risk factors for suicidal behavior and substance abuse.

To be eligible for this “Limited Competition” in an effort to address behavioral health disparities within AI/AN communities, the Indian Health Service (IHS) is limiting eligibility to Federally recognized Tribes, Tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations. Eligible applicants are as follows: — Federally recognized Indian Tribe, as defined by 25 U.S.C. 1603(14); — Tribal organization, as defined by 25 U.S.C. 1603(26); — Urban Indian organization, as defined by 25 U.S.C. 1603(29). Applicants must provide proof of non-profit status with the application, e.g., 501(c)(3). Current Closing Date for Applications: September 08, 2015.

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PPHF 2015: Tobacco Quitlines – A Comprehensive Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country – financed solely by 2015 Prevention and Public Health Funds

PPHF 2015: Tobacco Quitlines – A Comprehensive Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country – financed solely by 2015 Prevention and Public Health Funds – The primary purpose of this funding is to establish or strengthen and broaden the reach and impact of effective chronic disease prevention programs that improve the health of tribal members and communities. The approach includes a combination of policy and environmental approaches, community clinical linkages, and health system interventions. This 4-year supplemental Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to provide funding to the Component 2 grantees under DP14-1421PPHF14 to implement new commercial tobacco control activities as follows: Strategy 1 from DP14-1421PPHF14 Component 2 – Tribal Serving Organizations Program Logic Model: Work with tribes throughout the Area to assess the capacity of tribal programs and develop plans to implement Component 1 Strategic Activities. Applicants must select one activity for Strategy 1: Provide leadership, technical assistance, training, guidance and consultative support to tribes to develop plans to expand the reach of CDC Tips media campaigns or other federal tobacco education campaigns, Surgeon General Reports, and other tobacco related science/evidence-based publications. Provide leadership, technical assistance, training, guidance and consultative support to tribes to develop and implement plans to inform and educate tribal leaders, decision makers and tribal communities on the burden of commercial tobacco use to their tribal members and tribal economy. Strategy 4 from DP14-1421PPHF14 Component 2 – Tribal Serving Organizations Program Logic Model: Convene leadership meetings across tribes to share information and develop partnerships across tribes. Applicants must select one activity for Strategy 4: Provide leadership, technical assistance, training, guidance and consultative support to tribes to implement evidence based, culturally appropriate tribal interventions that increase the number of AI/AN protected from secondhand commercial tobacco smoke as a result of implementation of tobacco-free policies. Provide leadership, technical assistance, training, guidance and consultative support to tribes to implement evidence-based, culturally appropriate tribal interventions that decrease AI/AN exposure to commercial tobacco marketing and availability of commercial tobacco products. Current Closing Date for Applications: September 11, 2015.

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